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Cheriocrop.jpg
Cheriocrop.jpgCherio nebula.444 viewsM57 is located in Lyra, south of its brightest star Vega. Vega is the northwestern vertex of the three stars of the Summer Triangle. M57 lies about 40% of the angular distance from β Lyrae to γ Lyrae.[5]

M57 is best seen through at least a 20 cm (8-inch) telescope, but even a 7.5 cm (3-inch) telescope will show the ring.[5] Larger instruments will show a few darker zones on the eastern and western edges of the ring, and some faint nebulosity inside the disk.

This nebula was discovered by Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix in January, 1779, who reported that it was "...as large as Jupiter and resembles a planet which is fading." Later the same month, Charles Messier independently found the same nebula while searching for comets. It was then entered into his catalogue as the 57th object. Messier and William Herschel also speculated that the nebula was formed by multiple faint stars that were unable to resolve with his telescope.[6][7]

In 1800, Count Friedrich von Hahn discovered the faint central star in the heart of the nebula. In 1864, William Huggins examined the spectra of multiple nebulae, discovering that some of these objects, including M57, displayed the spectra of bright emission lines characteristic of fluorescing glowing gases. Huggins concluded that most planetary nebulae were not composed of unresolved stars, as had been previously suspected, but were nebulosities.[8][9]
Martin
NGC253done2Meg.jpg
NGC253done2Meg.jpgNGC253497 viewsG11 guiding test on 24-08-2011 with latest August firmware.
10x200Sec RGB and 25x300Sec L on a ED80 and QHY9.
Uncropped.
Martin
Jen3.jpg
Jen3.jpg566 viewsMartin
M48-done2M.jpg
M48-done2M.jpgM48.564 viewsMessier 48 (also known as M 48 or NGC 2548) is an open cluster in the Hydra constellation. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1771.

There is actually no cluster in the position indicated by Messier. The value that he gave for the right ascension matches that of NGC 2548, however, his declination is off by five degrees.Credit for discovery is sometimes given instead to Caroline Herschel in 1783.
Martin
goodbugcrop.jpg
goodbugcrop.jpgBug nebula.408 viewsNGC 6302 (also called the Bug Nebula or Butterfly Nebula), is a bipolar planetary nebula in the constellation Scorpius. It is one of the most complex[clarification needed] planetary nebulae observed. The spectrum of NGC 6302 shows its central star is one of the hottest objects in the galaxy, with a surface temperature in excess of 200,000 K, implying that the star from which it formed must have been very large.

The central star has never been observed and is surrounded by a particularly dense equatorial disc composed of gas and dust. This dense disc is postulated to have caused the star's outflows to form a bipolar structure (Gurzadyan 1997), similar to an hour-glass. This bipolar structure shows many interesting features seen in planetary nebulae such as ionization walls, knots and sharp edges to the lobes.
Martin
Centaurusdone1.jpg
Centaurusdone1.jpgCentaurus A.449 viewsThe Centaurus A/M83 Group is a complex group of galaxies in the constellations Hydra, Centaurus, and Virgo. The group may be roughly divided into two subgroups. The Cen A Subgroup, at a distance of 11.9 Mly (3.66 Mpc), is centered around Centaurus A, a nearby radio galaxy.[3] The M83 Subgroup, at a distance of 14.9 Mly (4.56 Mpc), is centered around the Messier 83 (M83), a face-on spiral galaxy.[3]

This group is sometimes identified as one group[4][5] and sometimes identified as two groups.[6] Hence, some references will refer to two objects named the Centaurus A Group and the M83 Group. However, the galaxies around Centaurus A and the galaxies around M83 are physically close to each other, and both subgroups appear not to be moving relative to each other.[3]

The Centaurus A/M83 Group is part of the Virgo Supercluster, the local supercluster of which the Local Group is an outlying member.
Martin
NGC1097-done.jpg
NGC1097-done.jpgNGC1097.460 viewsNGC 1097 is a barred spiral galaxy about 45 million light-years away in the constellation Fornax. Three supernovae (SN 1992bd, SN 1999eu, & SN 2003B) have been observed in NGC 1097 (as of 2006).
Star forming ring in NGC 1097. HST. 0.9′ view

NGC 1097 is also a Seyfert galaxy, with jets shooting from the core. Like most galaxies, NGC 1097 has a supermassive black hole at its center. Around the central black hole is a ring of star-forming regions with a network of gas and dust that spirals from the ring to the black hole.
Colour-composite image of the central 5,500 light-years wide region of the spiral galaxy NGC 1097, obtained with the NACO adaptive optics on the VLT. Credit: ESO
Almost-true colour composite based on three images made with the multi-mode VIMOS instrument on the 8.2-m Melipal (Unit Telescope 3) of ESO's Very Large Telescope. Credit: ESO


NGC 1097 has two satellite galaxies. NGC 1097A is the larger of the two. It is a peculiar elliptical galaxy that orbits 42,000 light-years from the center of NGC 1097. NGC 1097B is the outermost one and not much is known about that.
Martin
47Tucmoreblue2Gig.jpg
47Tucmoreblue2Gig.jpg47tuc518 viewsfor Trevor :)Martin

Last additions - User galleries
rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpg
rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpgRosetta in HA.512 viewsStill lots of noise in the surroundings so will need more exposures.MartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpg
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpgEta Carinae with the EQ8 mount.823 viewsMartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carina.jpg
Eta_Carina.jpgEta Carinae543 viewstest image with OAG.MartinFeb 12, 2014
Lagoondone2Mb.jpg
Lagoondone2Mb.jpgLagoon nebula680 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
triffid_done2MB.jpg
triffid_done2MB.jpgTriffid nebula747 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
testing.jpg
testing.jpgtestimage984 views2X30Seconds at ISO1600MartinMay 12, 2012
Sombrerocropdone.jpg
Sombrerocropdone.jpgSombrero galaxy1561 viewsThe Sombrero Galaxy (also known as M104 or NGC 4594) is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light years from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. The dark dust lane and the bulge give this galaxy the appearance of a sombrero. Astronomers initially thought that the halo was small and light, indicative of a spiral galaxy. But Spitzer found that halo around the Sombrero Galaxy is larger and more massive than previously thought, indicative of a giant elliptical galaxy. [5] The galaxy has an apparent magnitude of +9.0, making it easily visible with amateur telescopes. The large bulge, the central supermassive black hole, and the dust lane all attract the attention of professional astronomers.MartinMay 11, 2012
NGC4945.jpg
NGC4945.jpgNGC4945.1084 viewsNGC4945 with the Supernova.MartinApr 11, 2012