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Astronomy for all.
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Kens_den.jpg
Kens_den.jpg443 viewsKen's den.Martin
Geeks.jpg
Geeks.jpg429 viewsMartin
potholomy.jpg
potholomy.jpgNGC6475.527 viewsMessier 7 or M7, also designated NGC 6475 and sometimes known as the Ptolemy Cluster, is an open cluster of stars in the constellation of Scorpius.

The cluster is easily detectable with the naked eye, close to the "stinger" of Scorpius. It has been known since antiquity; it was first recorded by the 1st century astronomer Ptolemy, who described it as a nebula in 130 AD. Giovanni Batista Hodierna observed it before 1654 and counted 30 stars in it. Charles Messier catalogued the cluster in 1764 and subsequently included it in his list of comet-like objects as 'M7'.

Telescopic observations of the cluster reveal about 80 stars within a field of view of 1.3° across. At the cluster's estimated distance of 800-1000 light years this corresponds to an actual diameter of 18-25 light years. The age of the cluster is around 220 million years while the brightest star is of magnitude 5.6.
Martin
M45.jpg
M45.jpgM45.555 viewsIn astronomy, the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters (Messier object 45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. Pleiades has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternate name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium that the stars are currently passing through. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.
Martin
6067_done.jpg
6067_done.jpgNGC6067.962 viewsNGC 6067 is a bright open cluster deep South in the Constellation of Norma. Because it is located in the same plane of the Milky Way it has a dense star background. A nice target for small telescopes even from urban skies. The cluster contains about 100 stars between 8 magnitude and fainter.Martin
M48-done2M.jpg
M48-done2M.jpgM48.564 viewsMessier 48 (also known as M 48 or NGC 2548) is an open cluster in the Hydra constellation. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1771.

There is actually no cluster in the position indicated by Messier. The value that he gave for the right ascension matches that of NGC 2548, however, his declination is off by five degrees.Credit for discovery is sometimes given instead to Caroline Herschel in 1783.
Martin
Lagoon_done2G.jpg
Lagoon_done2G.jpgLagoon nebula.423 views16X10Minutes Luminance
10X100Seconds RGB
ED80 and QHY9 on a losmandy G11 with Gemini 2
This was just a guiding test after many problems.
Still not perfect but it is getting there.
Martin
NGC253done2Meg.jpg
NGC253done2Meg.jpgNGC253497 viewsG11 guiding test on 24-08-2011 with latest August firmware.
10x200Sec RGB and 25x300Sec L on a ED80 and QHY9.
Uncropped.
Martin

Last additions - User galleries
rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpg
rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpgRosetta in HA.512 viewsStill lots of noise in the surroundings so will need more exposures.MartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpg
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpgEta Carinae with the EQ8 mount.823 viewsMartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carina.jpg
Eta_Carina.jpgEta Carinae543 viewstest image with OAG.MartinFeb 12, 2014
Lagoondone2Mb.jpg
Lagoondone2Mb.jpgLagoon nebula680 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
triffid_done2MB.jpg
triffid_done2MB.jpgTriffid nebula747 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
testing.jpg
testing.jpgtestimage984 views2X30Seconds at ISO1600MartinMay 12, 2012
Sombrerocropdone.jpg
Sombrerocropdone.jpgSombrero galaxy1561 viewsThe Sombrero Galaxy (also known as M104 or NGC 4594) is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light years from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. The dark dust lane and the bulge give this galaxy the appearance of a sombrero. Astronomers initially thought that the halo was small and light, indicative of a spiral galaxy. But Spitzer found that halo around the Sombrero Galaxy is larger and more massive than previously thought, indicative of a giant elliptical galaxy. [5] The galaxy has an apparent magnitude of +9.0, making it easily visible with amateur telescopes. The large bulge, the central supermassive black hole, and the dust lane all attract the attention of professional astronomers.MartinMay 11, 2012
NGC4945.jpg
NGC4945.jpgNGC4945.1084 viewsNGC4945 with the Supernova.MartinApr 11, 2012