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NGC1097-done.jpg
NGC1097-done.jpgNGC1097.461 viewsNGC 1097 is a barred spiral galaxy about 45 million light-years away in the constellation Fornax. Three supernovae (SN 1992bd, SN 1999eu, & SN 2003B) have been observed in NGC 1097 (as of 2006).
Star forming ring in NGC 1097. HST. 0.9′ view

NGC 1097 is also a Seyfert galaxy, with jets shooting from the core. Like most galaxies, NGC 1097 has a supermassive black hole at its center. Around the central black hole is a ring of star-forming regions with a network of gas and dust that spirals from the ring to the black hole.
Colour-composite image of the central 5,500 light-years wide region of the spiral galaxy NGC 1097, obtained with the NACO adaptive optics on the VLT. Credit: ESO
Almost-true colour composite based on three images made with the multi-mode VIMOS instrument on the 8.2-m Melipal (Unit Telescope 3) of ESO's Very Large Telescope. Credit: ESO


NGC 1097 has two satellite galaxies. NGC 1097A is the larger of the two. It is a peculiar elliptical galaxy that orbits 42,000 light-years from the center of NGC 1097. NGC 1097B is the outermost one and not much is known about that.
Martin
Jen6.jpg
Jen6.jpg443 viewsMartin
47Tucmoreblue2Gig.jpg
47Tucmoreblue2Gig.jpg47tuc518 viewsfor Trevor :)Martin
M45.jpg
M45.jpgM45.555 viewsIn astronomy, the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters (Messier object 45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. Pleiades has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternate name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium that the stars are currently passing through. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.
Martin
Tarantula-done.jpg
Tarantula-done.jpgTarantula nebula.781 viewsThe Tarantula Nebula (also known as 30 Doradus, or NGC 2070) is an H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud. It was originally thought to be a star, but in 1751 Nicolas Louis de Lacaille recognized its nebular nature.

The Tarantula Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8. Considering its distance of about 49 kpc[2] (160,000 light years), this is an extremely luminous non-stellar object. Its luminosity is so great that if it were as close to Earth as the Orion Nebula, the Tarantula Nebula would cast shadows. In fact, it is the most active starburst region known in the Local Group of galaxies. It is also the largest such region in the Local Group with an estimated diameter of 200 pc.[3] The nebula resides on the leading edge of the LMC, where ram pressure stripping, and the compression of the interstellar medium likely resulting from this, is at a maximum. At its core lies the compact star cluster R136 (approx diameter 35 light years)[4] that produces most of the energy that makes the nebula visible. The estimated mass of the cluster is 450,000 solar masses, suggesting it will likely become a globular cluster in the future.
Martin
Lagoon_done2G.jpg
Lagoon_done2G.jpgLagoon nebula.424 views16X10Minutes Luminance
10X100Seconds RGB
ED80 and QHY9 on a losmandy G11 with Gemini 2
This was just a guiding test after many problems.
Still not perfect but it is getting there.
Martin
Shane_and_Shane.jpg
Shane_and_Shane.jpg463 viewsShane and Shane.
Very well reccomended :)
If you can go to an concert then go to Shane's band.
Martin
Leodone2G.jpg
Leodone2G.jpgLeo triplet510 viewsJust testing the guiding on the G11 with Gemini 2Martin

Last additions - User galleries
rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpg
rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpgRosetta in HA.513 viewsStill lots of noise in the surroundings so will need more exposures.MartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpg
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpgEta Carinae with the EQ8 mount.823 viewsMartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carina.jpg
Eta_Carina.jpgEta Carinae543 viewstest image with OAG.MartinFeb 12, 2014
Lagoondone2Mb.jpg
Lagoondone2Mb.jpgLagoon nebula680 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
triffid_done2MB.jpg
triffid_done2MB.jpgTriffid nebula748 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
testing.jpg
testing.jpgtestimage985 views2X30Seconds at ISO1600MartinMay 12, 2012
Sombrerocropdone.jpg
Sombrerocropdone.jpgSombrero galaxy1561 viewsThe Sombrero Galaxy (also known as M104 or NGC 4594) is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light years from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. The dark dust lane and the bulge give this galaxy the appearance of a sombrero. Astronomers initially thought that the halo was small and light, indicative of a spiral galaxy. But Spitzer found that halo around the Sombrero Galaxy is larger and more massive than previously thought, indicative of a giant elliptical galaxy. [5] The galaxy has an apparent magnitude of +9.0, making it easily visible with amateur telescopes. The large bulge, the central supermassive black hole, and the dust lane all attract the attention of professional astronomers.MartinMay 11, 2012
NGC4945.jpg
NGC4945.jpgNGC4945.1084 viewsNGC4945 with the Supernova.MartinApr 11, 2012