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Daniel.jpg
Daniel.jpg435 viewsMartin
Tarantula-done.jpg
Tarantula-done.jpgTarantula nebula.781 viewsThe Tarantula Nebula (also known as 30 Doradus, or NGC 2070) is an H II region in the Large Magellanic Cloud. It was originally thought to be a star, but in 1751 Nicolas Louis de Lacaille recognized its nebular nature.

The Tarantula Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8. Considering its distance of about 49 kpc[2] (160,000 light years), this is an extremely luminous non-stellar object. Its luminosity is so great that if it were as close to Earth as the Orion Nebula, the Tarantula Nebula would cast shadows. In fact, it is the most active starburst region known in the Local Group of galaxies. It is also the largest such region in the Local Group with an estimated diameter of 200 pc.[3] The nebula resides on the leading edge of the LMC, where ram pressure stripping, and the compression of the interstellar medium likely resulting from this, is at a maximum. At its core lies the compact star cluster R136 (approx diameter 35 light years)[4] that produces most of the energy that makes the nebula visible. The estimated mass of the cluster is 450,000 solar masses, suggesting it will likely become a globular cluster in the future.
Martin
NGC4945.jpg
NGC4945.jpgNGC4945.1084 viewsNGC4945 with the Supernova.Martin
Lagoon_done2G.jpg
Lagoon_done2G.jpgLagoon nebula.424 views16X10Minutes Luminance
10X100Seconds RGB
ED80 and QHY9 on a losmandy G11 with Gemini 2
This was just a guiding test after many problems.
Still not perfect but it is getting there.
Martin
Omega-test.jpg
Omega-test.jpgOmega Centauri.664 viewsOmega Centauri (ω Cen) or NGC 5139 is a globular cluster[7] seen in the constellation of Centaurus, discovered by Edmond Halley in 1677 who listed it as a nebula. Omega Centauri had been listed in Ptolemy's catalog 2000 years ago as a star. Lacaille included it in his catalog as number I.5. It was first recognized as a globular cluster by the English astronomer John William Herschel in the 1830s.[8] Orbiting the Milky Way, it is both the brightest and the largest known globular cluster associated with our galaxy (1.6 Em). Of all the globular clusters in the Local Group of galaxies, only Mayall II in the Andromeda Galaxy is brighter and more massive.[9] ω Centauri is so different from other galactic globular clusters, that it is thought to be of different origin.[10]

Omega Centauri is located about 15,800 light-years (4,850 pc) from Earth and contains several million Population II stars. The stars in its center are so crowded that they are estimated to average only 0.1 light years away from each other. It is about 12 billion years old
Martin
Kens_den.jpg
Kens_den.jpg443 viewsKen's den.Martin
Alex.jpg
Alex.jpg567 viewsMartin
NGC253done2Meg.jpg
NGC253done2Meg.jpgNGC253498 viewsG11 guiding test on 24-08-2011 with latest August firmware.
10x200Sec RGB and 25x300Sec L on a ED80 and QHY9.
Uncropped.
Martin

Last additions - User galleries
rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpg
rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpgRosetta in HA.513 viewsStill lots of noise in the surroundings so will need more exposures.MartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpg
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpgEta Carinae with the EQ8 mount.823 viewsMartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carina.jpg
Eta_Carina.jpgEta Carinae543 viewstest image with OAG.MartinFeb 12, 2014
Lagoondone2Mb.jpg
Lagoondone2Mb.jpgLagoon nebula680 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
triffid_done2MB.jpg
triffid_done2MB.jpgTriffid nebula748 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
testing.jpg
testing.jpgtestimage985 views2X30Seconds at ISO1600MartinMay 12, 2012
Sombrerocropdone.jpg
Sombrerocropdone.jpgSombrero galaxy1561 viewsThe Sombrero Galaxy (also known as M104 or NGC 4594) is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light years from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. The dark dust lane and the bulge give this galaxy the appearance of a sombrero. Astronomers initially thought that the halo was small and light, indicative of a spiral galaxy. But Spitzer found that halo around the Sombrero Galaxy is larger and more massive than previously thought, indicative of a giant elliptical galaxy. [5] The galaxy has an apparent magnitude of +9.0, making it easily visible with amateur telescopes. The large bulge, the central supermassive black hole, and the dust lane all attract the attention of professional astronomers.MartinMay 11, 2012
NGC4945.jpg
NGC4945.jpgNGC4945.1084 viewsNGC4945 with the Supernova.MartinApr 11, 2012