martinsastro

Astronomy for all.
Home > User galleries

Last additions - User galleries
ngc6822_done1Mb.jpg
ngc6822_done1Mb.jpgNgc6822.382 viewsNGC 6822 (also known as Barnard's Galaxy or IC 4895) is a barred irregular galaxy approximately 1.6 million light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. Part of the Local Group of galaxies, it was discovered by E. E. Barnard in 1881 (hence its name), with a six-inch refractor telescope. It is one of the closer galaxies to the Milky Way. It is similar in structure and composition to the Small Magellanic Cloud.MartinOct 18, 2010
galaxiesdone.jpg
galaxiesdone.jpgUnknown.392 viewsJust a picture of some galaxies.MartinOct 18, 2010
Centaurusdone1.jpg
Centaurusdone1.jpgCentaurus A.394 viewsThe Centaurus A/M83 Group is a complex group of galaxies in the constellations Hydra, Centaurus, and Virgo. The group may be roughly divided into two subgroups. The Cen A Subgroup, at a distance of 11.9 Mly (3.66 Mpc), is centered around Centaurus A, a nearby radio galaxy.[3] The M83 Subgroup, at a distance of 14.9 Mly (4.56 Mpc), is centered around the Messier 83 (M83), a face-on spiral galaxy.[3]

This group is sometimes identified as one group[4][5] and sometimes identified as two groups.[6] Hence, some references will refer to two objects named the Centaurus A Group and the M83 Group. However, the galaxies around Centaurus A and the galaxies around M83 are physically close to each other, and both subgroups appear not to be moving relative to each other.[3]

The Centaurus A/M83 Group is part of the Virgo Supercluster, the local supercluster of which the Local Group is an outlying member.
MartinOct 18, 2010
centaurus-A.jpg
centaurus-A.jpgCentaurus A.487 viewsThe Centaurus A/M83 Group is a complex group of galaxies in the constellations Hydra, Centaurus, and Virgo. The group may be roughly divided into two subgroups. The Cen A Subgroup, at a distance of 11.9 Mly (3.66 Mpc), is centered around Centaurus A, a nearby radio galaxy.[3] The M83 Subgroup, at a distance of 14.9 Mly (4.56 Mpc), is centered around the Messier 83 (M83), a face-on spiral galaxy.[3]

This group is sometimes identified as one group[4][5] and sometimes identified as two groups.[6] Hence, some references will refer to two objects named the Centaurus A Group and the M83 Group. However, the galaxies around Centaurus A and the galaxies around M83 are physically close to each other, and both subgroups appear not to be moving relative to each other.[3]

The Centaurus A/M83 Group is part of the Virgo Supercluster, the local supercluster of which the Local Group is an outlying member.
MartinOct 18, 2010
Centaurus_done.jpg
Centaurus_done.jpgCentaurus A.524 viewsThe Centaurus A/M83 Group is a complex group of galaxies in the constellations Hydra, Centaurus, and Virgo. The group may be roughly divided into two subgroups. The Cen A Subgroup, at a distance of 11.9 Mly (3.66 Mpc), is centered around Centaurus A, a nearby radio galaxy.[3] The M83 Subgroup, at a distance of 14.9 Mly (4.56 Mpc), is centered around the Messier 83 (M83), a face-on spiral galaxy.[3]

This group is sometimes identified as one group[4][5] and sometimes identified as two groups.[6] Hence, some references will refer to two objects named the Centaurus A Group and the M83 Group. However, the galaxies around Centaurus A and the galaxies around M83 are physically close to each other, and both subgroups appear not to be moving relative to each other.[3]

The Centaurus A/M83 Group is part of the Virgo Supercluster, the local supercluster of which the Local Group is an outlying member.
MartinOct 18, 2010
1060_1M.jpg
1060_1M.jpgNGC1060.551 viewsThe Hydra Cluster (or Abell 1060) is a cluster of galaxies that contains 157 bright galaxies and can be viewed from earth in the constellation Hydra. [3] The cluster spans about ten million light years and has an unusual high proportion of dark matter. [4] The cluster is part of the Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster located 158 million light years from earth. The cluster's largest galaxies are elliptical galaxies NGC 3309 and NGC 3311 and the spiral galaxy NGC 3312 all having a diameter of about 150,000 light years.[5] In spite of a nearly circular appearance on the sky, there is evidence in the galaxy velocities for a clumpy, three-dimensional distribution.[MartinOct 18, 2010
   
114 files on 10 page(s) 10