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Swan_done.jpg
Swan_done.jpgSwan nebula.581 viewsThe Omega Nebula, also known as the Swan Nebula and the Horseshoe Nebula[2] (catalogued as Messier 17 or M17 and as NGC 6618) is an H II region in the constellation Sagittarius. It was discovered by Philippe Loys de Chéseaux in 1745. Charles Messier catalogued it in 1764. It is located in the rich starfields of the Sagittarius area of the Milky Way.

The Omega Nebula is between 5,000 and 6,000 light-years from Earth and it spans some 15 light-years in diameter. The cloud of interstellar matter of which this nebula is a part is roughly 40 light-years in diameter. The total mass of the Omega Nebula is an estimated 800 solar masses.

A open cluster of 35 stars lies embedded in the nebulosity and causes the gases of the nebula to shine due to radiation from these hot, young stars.
Martin
Fog.jpg
Fog.jpg437 viewsMartin
Dougs_G11.jpg
Dougs_G11.jpg447 viewsMartin
47Tucmoreblue2Gig.jpg
47Tucmoreblue2Gig.jpg47tuc529 viewsfor Trevor :)Martin
Malcolm.jpg
Malcolm.jpg439 viewsMartin
potholomy.jpg
potholomy.jpgNGC6475.538 viewsMessier 7 or M7, also designated NGC 6475 and sometimes known as the Ptolemy Cluster, is an open cluster of stars in the constellation of Scorpius.

The cluster is easily detectable with the naked eye, close to the "stinger" of Scorpius. It has been known since antiquity; it was first recorded by the 1st century astronomer Ptolemy, who described it as a nebula in 130 AD. Giovanni Batista Hodierna observed it before 1654 and counted 30 stars in it. Charles Messier catalogued the cluster in 1764 and subsequently included it in his list of comet-like objects as 'M7'.

Telescopic observations of the cluster reveal about 80 stars within a field of view of 1.3° across. At the cluster's estimated distance of 800-1000 light years this corresponds to an actual diameter of 18-25 light years. The age of the cluster is around 220 million years while the brightest star is of magnitude 5.6.
Martin
Watch_out_Dazza.jpg
Watch_out_Dazza.jpg506 viewsCould not resist this one :)Martin
Centaurusdone1.jpg
Centaurusdone1.jpgCentaurus A.469 viewsThe Centaurus A/M83 Group is a complex group of galaxies in the constellations Hydra, Centaurus, and Virgo. The group may be roughly divided into two subgroups. The Cen A Subgroup, at a distance of 11.9 Mly (3.66 Mpc), is centered around Centaurus A, a nearby radio galaxy.[3] The M83 Subgroup, at a distance of 14.9 Mly (4.56 Mpc), is centered around the Messier 83 (M83), a face-on spiral galaxy.[3]

This group is sometimes identified as one group[4][5] and sometimes identified as two groups.[6] Hence, some references will refer to two objects named the Centaurus A Group and the M83 Group. However, the galaxies around Centaurus A and the galaxies around M83 are physically close to each other, and both subgroups appear not to be moving relative to each other.[3]

The Centaurus A/M83 Group is part of the Virgo Supercluster, the local supercluster of which the Local Group is an outlying member.
Martin

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rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpg
rosette_done_ha2Mb.jpgRosetta in HA.527 viewsStill lots of noise in the surroundings so will need more exposures.MartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpg
Eta_Carinae_done_ha2Mb.jpgEta Carinae with the EQ8 mount.837 viewsMartinDec 28, 2014
Eta_Carina.jpg
Eta_Carina.jpgEta Carinae557 viewstest image with OAG.MartinFeb 12, 2014
Lagoondone2Mb.jpg
Lagoondone2Mb.jpgLagoon nebula693 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
triffid_done2MB.jpg
triffid_done2MB.jpgTriffid nebula763 viewsDone with the ED100 and Hutech FR/FF.MartinMay 15, 2013
testing.jpg
testing.jpgtestimage1001 views2X30Seconds at ISO1600MartinMay 12, 2012
Sombrerocropdone.jpg
Sombrerocropdone.jpgSombrero galaxy1579 viewsThe Sombrero Galaxy (also known as M104 or NGC 4594) is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Virgo located 28 million light years from Earth. It has a bright nucleus, an unusually large central bulge, and a prominent dust lane in its inclined disk. The dark dust lane and the bulge give this galaxy the appearance of a sombrero. Astronomers initially thought that the halo was small and light, indicative of a spiral galaxy. But Spitzer found that halo around the Sombrero Galaxy is larger and more massive than previously thought, indicative of a giant elliptical galaxy. [5] The galaxy has an apparent magnitude of +9.0, making it easily visible with amateur telescopes. The large bulge, the central supermassive black hole, and the dust lane all attract the attention of professional astronomers.MartinMay 11, 2012
NGC4945.jpg
NGC4945.jpgNGC4945.1102 viewsNGC4945 with the Supernova.MartinApr 11, 2012