martinsastro

Astronomy for all.
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misc


Lester.jpg

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Dargo to Licola


IMG_0518.jpg

18 files, last one added on May 21, 2016
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Camper trailer files.



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253redone2Gig.jpg
253redone2Gig.jpgNGC253 Redone470 viewsA repro (last time, i promise).Martin
Lester.jpg
Lester.jpgMore data.317 viewsMartin
ngc3293_3324.jpg
ngc3293_3324.jpgNGC3293 and 3324.474 viewsNGC 3293 is an open cluster in the Carina constellation. It was discovered by Abbe Lacaille in 1751-52. It consists of more than 50 stars in a 10 arc minutes field, the brightest of which is a red giant of mag 6.5.Martin
etaha-2.jpg
etaha-2.jpgEta Carinae in HA.595 viewsThis stellar system is currently one of the most massive that can be studied in great detail. Until recently, Eta Carinae was thought to be the most massive single star, but it was recently demoted to a binary system.[7] The most massive star in the Eta Carinae multiple star system has more than 100 times the mass of the Sun. Other known massive stars are more luminous and more massive.

Stars in the mass class of Eta Carinae, with more than 100 times the mass of the Sun, produce more than a million times as much light as the Sun. They are quite rare — only a few dozen in a galaxy as big as the Milky Way. They are assumed to approach (or potentially exceed) the Eddington limit, i.e., the outward pressure of their radiation is almost strong enough to counteract gravity. Stars that are more than 120 solar masses exceed the theoretical Eddington limit, and their gravity is barely strong enough to hold in their radiation and gas.

Eta Carinae's chief significance for astrophysics is based on its giant eruption or supernova impostor event, which was observed around 1843. In a few years, Eta Carinae produced almost as much visible light as a supernova explosion, but it survived. Other supernova impostors have been seen in other galaxies, for example the false supernovae SN 1961v in NGC 1058[8] and SN 2006jc in UGC 4904,[9] which produced a false supernova, noted in October 2004. Significantly, SN 2006jc was destroyed in a supernova explosion two years later, observed on October 9, 2006.[10] The supernova impostor phenomenon may represent a surface instability[11] or a failed supernova. Eta Carinae's giant eruption was the prototype for this phenomenon, and after nearly 170 years the star's internal structure has not fully recovered.
Martin
Eta_Carina.jpg
Eta_Carina.jpgEta Carinae558 viewstest image with OAG.Martin
Cheriocrop.jpg
Cheriocrop.jpgCherio nebula.455 viewsM57 is located in Lyra, south of its brightest star Vega. Vega is the northwestern vertex of the three stars of the Summer Triangle. M57 lies about 40% of the angular distance from β Lyrae to γ Lyrae.[5]

M57 is best seen through at least a 20 cm (8-inch) telescope, but even a 7.5 cm (3-inch) telescope will show the ring.[5] Larger instruments will show a few darker zones on the eastern and western edges of the ring, and some faint nebulosity inside the disk.

This nebula was discovered by Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix in January, 1779, who reported that it was "...as large as Jupiter and resembles a planet which is fading." Later the same month, Charles Messier independently found the same nebula while searching for comets. It was then entered into his catalogue as the 57th object. Messier and William Herschel also speculated that the nebula was formed by multiple faint stars that were unable to resolve with his telescope.[6][7]

In 1800, Count Friedrich von Hahn discovered the faint central star in the heart of the nebula. In 1864, William Huggins examined the spectra of multiple nebulae, discovering that some of these objects, including M57, displayed the spectra of bright emission lines characteristic of fluorescing glowing gases. Huggins concluded that most planetary nebulae were not composed of unresolved stars, as had been previously suspected, but were nebulosities.[8][9]
Martin
Dougs_scope.jpg
Dougs_scope.jpg460 viewsMartin
Daniel.jpg
Daniel.jpg447 viewsMartin

Last additions
IMG_0518.jpg
IMG_0518.jpgnice view476 viewsnice viewMartinMay 21, 2016
IMG_0517.jpg
IMG_0517.jpgARB Kev542 viewsARB Kev.MartinMay 21, 2016
IMG_0516.jpg
IMG_0516.jpg309 viewsKev's CarMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0515.jpg315 viewsJacki and carMartinMay 21, 2016
IMG_0514.jpg
IMG_0514.jpg313 viewsAlex's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0513.jpg313 viewsScotty's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0512.jpg324 viewsMark beside his carMartinMay 21, 2016
IMG_0511.jpg
IMG_0511.jpg313 viewsHang this in the ceiling and Mark will be out of business :PMartinMay 21, 2016