martinsastro

Astronomy for all.
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NGC55done.jpg
NGC55done.jpgNGC55.467 viewsNGC 55 (also known as Caldwell 72) is a barred irregular galaxy located about 7 million light-years away in the constellation Sculptor. Along with its neighbor NGC 300, it is one the closest galaxies to the Local Group, probably lying between us and the Sculptor Group.
NGC 55 and the spiral galaxy NGC 300 have traditionally been identified as members of the Sculptor Group, a nearby group of galaxies in the constellation of the same name.
Martin
Omegadone2G.jpg
Omegadone2G.jpgOmega Centaury.517 viewsJust testing the guiding on the G11 with Gemini 2Martin
Ken_.jpg
Ken_.jpg429 viewsMartin
Jen_preparing.jpg
Jen_preparing.jpg424 viewsMartin
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IMG_0512.jpg296 viewsMark beside his carMartin
jewelbox.jpg
jewelbox.jpgJewelbox.2158 viewsThe Jewel Box (also known as NGC 4755, the Kappa Crucis Cluster and Caldwell 94) is an open cluster in the constellation of Crux. As Kappa Crucis, it has a Bayer designation despite the fact that it is a cluster rather than an individual star.

It is one of the finest open clusters discovered by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille when he was in South Africa during 1751–1752. This cluster is one of the youngest known, with an estimated age of only 7.1 million years. It has an apparent magnitude of 4.2, and is located 6,440 light years from Earth and contains around 100 stars.

This famous group of young bright stars was named the Jewel Box from its description by Sir John Herschel as "a casket of variously coloured precious stones," which refers to its appearance in the telescope. The bright orange star Kappa Crucis contrasts strongly against its predominantly blue, hot companions. Kappa Crucis is a very large (hence very luminous) young star in its red supergiant stage, which paradoxically indicates that its life is drawing to a close. The cluster looks like a star to the unaided eye and appears close to the easternmost star of the Southern Cross, (Beta Crucis), so is only visible from southern latitudes.
Martin
chickenHA.jpg
chickenHA.jpgChicken nebula.532 viewsIC 2944, also known as the Running Chicken Nebula or the Lambda Cen Nebula, is an open cluster with an associated emission nebula found in the constellation Centaurus, near the star Lambda Centauri. It features Bok globules and is most likely a site of active star formation.

The Hubble Space Telescope image on the right is a close up of Bok Globules discovered in IC 2944 by South African astronomer A. David Thackeray in 1950[2]. These globules are now known as Thackeray's Globules.
Martin
Cheriocrop.jpg
Cheriocrop.jpgCherio nebula.434 viewsM57 is located in Lyra, south of its brightest star Vega. Vega is the northwestern vertex of the three stars of the Summer Triangle. M57 lies about 40% of the angular distance from β Lyrae to γ Lyrae.[5]

M57 is best seen through at least a 20 cm (8-inch) telescope, but even a 7.5 cm (3-inch) telescope will show the ring.[5] Larger instruments will show a few darker zones on the eastern and western edges of the ring, and some faint nebulosity inside the disk.

This nebula was discovered by Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix in January, 1779, who reported that it was "...as large as Jupiter and resembles a planet which is fading." Later the same month, Charles Messier independently found the same nebula while searching for comets. It was then entered into his catalogue as the 57th object. Messier and William Herschel also speculated that the nebula was formed by multiple faint stars that were unable to resolve with his telescope.[6][7]

In 1800, Count Friedrich von Hahn discovered the faint central star in the heart of the nebula. In 1864, William Huggins examined the spectra of multiple nebulae, discovering that some of these objects, including M57, displayed the spectra of bright emission lines characteristic of fluorescing glowing gases. Huggins concluded that most planetary nebulae were not composed of unresolved stars, as had been previously suspected, but were nebulosities.[8][9]
Martin

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IMG_0518.jpgnice view373 viewsnice viewMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0517.jpgARB Kev436 viewsARB Kev.MartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0516.jpg282 viewsKev's CarMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0515.jpg290 viewsJacki and carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0514.jpg288 viewsAlex's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0513.jpg287 viewsScotty's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0512.jpg296 viewsMark beside his carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0511.jpg290 viewsHang this in the ceiling and Mark will be out of business :PMartinMay 21, 2016