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Chicken-done2G.jpg
Chicken-done2G.jpgChicken nebula.523 viewsJust testing the guiding on the G11 with Gemini 2MartinApr 09, 2011
Omegadone2G.jpg
Omegadone2G.jpgOmega Centaury.518 viewsJust testing the guiding on the G11 with Gemini 2MartinApr 09, 2011
Leodone2G.jpg
Leodone2G.jpgLeo triplet500 viewsJust testing the guiding on the G11 with Gemini 2MartinApr 09, 2011
eta-done2G.jpg
eta-done2G.jpgEta Carinae498 viewsJust testing the guiding on the G11 with Gemini 2MartinApr 09, 2011
M48-done2M.jpg
M48-done2M.jpgM48.553 viewsMessier 48 (also known as M 48 or NGC 2548) is an open cluster in the Hydra constellation. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1771.

There is actually no cluster in the position indicated by Messier. The value that he gave for the right ascension matches that of NGC 2548, however, his declination is off by five degrees.Credit for discovery is sometimes given instead to Caroline Herschel in 1783.
MartinJan 29, 2011
Omega-test.jpg
Omega-test.jpgOmega Centauri.652 viewsOmega Centauri (ω Cen) or NGC 5139 is a globular cluster[7] seen in the constellation of Centaurus, discovered by Edmond Halley in 1677 who listed it as a nebula. Omega Centauri had been listed in Ptolemy's catalog 2000 years ago as a star. Lacaille included it in his catalog as number I.5. It was first recognized as a globular cluster by the English astronomer John William Herschel in the 1830s.[8] Orbiting the Milky Way, it is both the brightest and the largest known globular cluster associated with our galaxy (1.6 Em). Of all the globular clusters in the Local Group of galaxies, only Mayall II in the Andromeda Galaxy is brighter and more massive.[9] ω Centauri is so different from other galactic globular clusters, that it is thought to be of different origin.[10]

Omega Centauri is located about 15,800 light-years (4,850 pc) from Earth and contains several million Population II stars. The stars in its center are so crowded that they are estimated to average only 0.1 light years away from each other. It is about 12 billion years old
MartinJan 29, 2011
Etadone.jpg
Etadone.jpgEta Carinae.637 viewsThis is done with the QHY9M.
RGB each 5X200 Seconds.
Luminance 8X600 Seconds.
Telescope: ED80 with 0.85 reducer/flattner.
MartinJan 16, 2011
M45.jpg
M45.jpgM45.543 viewsIn astronomy, the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters (Messier object 45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. Pleiades has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternate name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium that the stars are currently passing through. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.
MartinNov 11, 2010
Horsehead.jpg
Horsehead.jpgHorsehead.693 viewsThe Horsehead Nebula (also known as Barnard 33 in bright nebula IC 434) is a dark nebula in the constellation Orion. The nebula is located just below (to the south of) Alnitak, the star farthest left on Orion's Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The Horsehead Nebula is approximately 1500 light years from Earth. It is one of the most identifiable nebulae because of the shape of its swirling cloud of dark dust and gases, which is similar to that of a horse's head when viewed from Earth. The shape was first noticed in 1888 by Williamina Fleming on photographic plate B2312 taken at the Harvard College Observatory.

The red glow originates from hydrogen gas predominantly behind the nebula, ionized by the nearby bright star Sigma Orionis. The darkness of the Horsehead is caused mostly by thick dust, although the lower part of the Horsehead's neck casts a shadow to the left. Streams of gas leaving the nebula are funneled by a strong magnetic field. Bright spots in the Horsehead Nebula's base are young stars just in the process of forming.
MartinNov 11, 2010
1123_and_1124.jpg
1123_and_1124.jpgAr1123 and 1124.520 viewsMartinNov 11, 2010
Pier.jpg
Pier.jpg448 viewsMartinNov 10, 2010
Morning.jpg
Morning.jpg434 viewsMartinNov 10, 2010
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