martinsastro

Astronomy for all.
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Dargo to Licola


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18 files, last one added on May 21, 2016
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Camper trailer files.



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jewelbox.jpg
jewelbox.jpgJewelbox.2294 viewsThe Jewel Box (also known as NGC 4755, the Kappa Crucis Cluster and Caldwell 94) is an open cluster in the constellation of Crux. As Kappa Crucis, it has a Bayer designation despite the fact that it is a cluster rather than an individual star.

It is one of the finest open clusters discovered by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille when he was in South Africa during 1751–1752. This cluster is one of the youngest known, with an estimated age of only 7.1 million years. It has an apparent magnitude of 4.2, and is located 6,440 light years from Earth and contains around 100 stars.

This famous group of young bright stars was named the Jewel Box from its description by Sir John Herschel as "a casket of variously coloured precious stones," which refers to its appearance in the telescope. The bright orange star Kappa Crucis contrasts strongly against its predominantly blue, hot companions. Kappa Crucis is a very large (hence very luminous) young star in its red supergiant stage, which paradoxically indicates that its life is drawing to a close. The cluster looks like a star to the unaided eye and appears close to the easternmost star of the Southern Cross, (Beta Crucis), so is only visible from southern latitudes.
Martin
Group1-L_flattener.jpg
Group1-L_flattener.jpgwith flattener1441 viewsMartin
Jen6.jpg
Jen6.jpg561 viewsMartin
catspaw.jpg
catspaw.jpgCats paw nebula.983 viewsNGC 6334 (also known as the Cat's Paw Nebula , Bear Claw Nebula and Gum 64) is an emission nebula located in the constellation Scorpius.[2] It was discovered by astronomer John Herschel in 1837, who observed it from the Cape of Good Hope in South Africa.Martin
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Grasshopper.jpg560 viewsMartin
m42done.jpg
m42done.jpgM42.997 viewsThe Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south of Orion's Belt. It is one of the brightest nebulae, and is visible to the naked eye in the night sky. M42 is located at a distance of 1,344 ± 20 light years[2][5] and is the closest region of massive star formation to Earth. The M42 nebula is estimated to be 24 light years across. Older texts frequently referred to the Orion Nebula as the Great Nebula in Orion or the Great Orion Nebula.

The Orion Nebula is one of the most scrutinized and photographed objects in the night sky, and is among the most intensely studied celestial features.[6] The nebula has revealed much about the process of how stars and planetary systems are formed from collapsing clouds of gas and dust. Astronomers have directly observed protoplanetary disks, brown dwarfs, intense and turbulent motions of the gas, and the photo-ionizing effects of massive nearby stars in the nebula. There are also supersonic "bullets" of gas piercing the dense hydrogen clouds of the Orion Nebula. Each bullet is ten times the diameter of Pluto's orbit and tipped with iron atoms glowing bright blue. They were probably formed one thousand years ago from an unknown violent event.
Martin
etacrop.jpg
etacrop.jpgEta Carinae nebula.704 viewsThis stellar system is currently one of the most massive that can be studied in great detail. Until recently, Eta Carinae was thought to be the most massive single star, but it was recently demoted to a binary system.[7] The most massive star in the Eta Carinae multiple star system has more than 100 times the mass of the Sun. Other known massive stars are more luminous and more massive.

Stars in the mass class of Eta Carinae, with more than 100 times the mass of the Sun, produce more than a million times as much light as the Sun. They are quite rare — only a few dozen in a galaxy as big as the Milky Way. They are assumed to approach (or potentially exceed) the Eddington limit, i.e., the outward pressure of their radiation is almost strong enough to counteract gravity. Stars that are more than 120 solar masses exceed the theoretical Eddington limit, and their gravity is barely strong enough to hold in their radiation and gas.

Eta Carinae's chief significance for astrophysics is based on its giant eruption or supernova impostor event, which was observed around 1843. In a few years, Eta Carinae produced almost as much visible light as a supernova explosion, but it survived. Other supernova impostors have been seen in other galaxies, for example the false supernovae SN 1961v in NGC 1058[8] and SN 2006jc in UGC 4904,[9] which produced a false supernova, noted in October 2004. Significantly, SN 2006jc was destroyed in a supernova explosion two years later, observed on October 9, 2006.[10] The supernova impostor phenomenon may represent a surface instability[11] or a failed supernova. Eta Carinae's giant eruption was the prototype for this phenomenon, and after nearly 170 years the star's internal structure has not fully recovered.
Martin
CentAfinal2G.jpg
CentAfinal2G.jpgCentaurus A1248 views10 X 5 Min RGB and 15 X 10 Min Luminance.
Martin

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IMG_0518.jpgnice view975 viewsnice viewMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0517.jpgARB Kev1029 viewsARB Kev.MartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0516.jpg495 viewsKev's CarMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0515.jpg505 viewsJacki and carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0514.jpg503 viewsAlex's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0513.jpg514 viewsScotty's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0512.jpg511 viewsMark beside his carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0511.jpg503 viewsHang this in the ceiling and Mark will be out of business :PMartinMay 21, 2016