martinsastro

Astronomy for all.
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133 files in 12 albums and 1 categories with 0 comments viewed 37,385 times

misc


Lester.jpg

1 files, last one added on Dec 26, 2011
Album viewed 208 times

Dargo to Licola


IMG_0518.jpg

18 files, last one added on May 21, 2016
Album viewed 39 times

Camper trailer files.



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eta-done2G.jpg
eta-done2G.jpgEta Carinae251 viewsJust testing the guiding on the G11 with Gemini 2Martin
NGC1097-done.jpg
NGC1097-done.jpgNGC1097.203 viewsNGC 1097 is a barred spiral galaxy about 45 million light-years away in the constellation Fornax. Three supernovae (SN 1992bd, SN 1999eu, & SN 2003B) have been observed in NGC 1097 (as of 2006).
Star forming ring in NGC 1097. HST. 0.9′ view

NGC 1097 is also a Seyfert galaxy, with jets shooting from the core. Like most galaxies, NGC 1097 has a supermassive black hole at its center. Around the central black hole is a ring of star-forming regions with a network of gas and dust that spirals from the ring to the black hole.
Colour-composite image of the central 5,500 light-years wide region of the spiral galaxy NGC 1097, obtained with the NACO adaptive optics on the VLT. Credit: ESO
Almost-true colour composite based on three images made with the multi-mode VIMOS instrument on the 8.2-m Melipal (Unit Telescope 3) of ESO's Very Large Telescope. Credit: ESO


NGC 1097 has two satellite galaxies. NGC 1097A is the larger of the two. It is a peculiar elliptical galaxy that orbits 42,000 light-years from the center of NGC 1097. NGC 1097B is the outermost one and not much is known about that.
Martin
ngc6822_done1Mb.jpg
ngc6822_done1Mb.jpgNgc6822.181 viewsNGC 6822 (also known as Barnard's Galaxy or IC 4895) is a barred irregular galaxy approximately 1.6 million light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. Part of the Local Group of galaxies, it was discovered by E. E. Barnard in 1881 (hence its name), with a six-inch refractor telescope. It is one of the closer galaxies to the Milky Way. It is similar in structure and composition to the Small Magellanic Cloud.Martin
Malcolm.jpg
Malcolm.jpg187 viewsMartin
IMG_0502.jpg
IMG_0502.jpg46 viewsMark and his carMartin
Pier.jpg
Pier.jpg205 viewsMartin
goodbugcrop.jpg
goodbugcrop.jpgBug nebula.181 viewsNGC 6302 (also called the Bug Nebula or Butterfly Nebula), is a bipolar planetary nebula in the constellation Scorpius. It is one of the most complex[clarification needed] planetary nebulae observed. The spectrum of NGC 6302 shows its central star is one of the hottest objects in the galaxy, with a surface temperature in excess of 200,000 K, implying that the star from which it formed must have been very large.

The central star has never been observed and is surrounded by a particularly dense equatorial disc composed of gas and dust. This dense disc is postulated to have caused the star's outflows to form a bipolar structure (Gurzadyan 1997), similar to an hour-glass. This bipolar structure shows many interesting features seen in planetary nebulae such as ionization walls, knots and sharp edges to the lobes.
Martin
horsephotobucket.jpg
horsephotobucket.jpgHorsehead nebula.308 viewsThe Horsehead Nebula (also known as Barnard 33 in bright nebula IC 434) is a dark nebula in the constellation Orion. The nebula is located just below (to the south of) Alnitak, the star farthest left on Orion's Belt, and is part of the much larger Orion Molecular Cloud Complex. The Horsehead Nebula is approximately 1500 light years from Earth. It is one of the most identifiable nebulae because of the shape of its swirling cloud of dark dust and gases, which is similar to that of a horse's head when viewed from Earth. The shape was first noticed in 1888 by Williamina Fleming on photographic plate B2312 taken at the Harvard College Observatory.

The red glow originates from hydrogen gas predominantly behind the nebula, ionized by the nearby bright star Sigma Orionis. The darkness of the Horsehead is caused mostly by thick dust, although the lower part of the Horsehead's neck casts a shadow to the left. Streams of gas leaving the nebula are funneled by a strong magnetic field. Bright spots in the Horsehead Nebula's base are young stars just in the process of forming.
Martin

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IMG_0518.jpg
IMG_0518.jpgnice view60 viewsnice viewMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0517.jpgARB Kev75 viewsARB Kev.MartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0516.jpg58 viewsKev's CarMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0515.jpg58 viewsJacki and carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0514.jpg64 viewsAlex's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0513.jpg61 viewsScotty's carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0512.jpg61 viewsMark beside his carMartinMay 21, 2016
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IMG_0511.jpg61 viewsHang this in the ceiling and Mark will be out of business :PMartinMay 21, 2016